The Center for Social Innovation (CSI) at Stanford GSB is dedicated to creating social and environmental change in the world. Through research, education, and experiential learning, CSI strengthens the capacity of individuals and organizations to develop innovative solutions for poverty alleviation, access to healthcare and education, sustainable development, environmental protection, human rights, and more.

SOUTH DEVON RESILIENCE STRATEGY

Resilience is the capacity of a system, be it an individual, a forest, a city or an economy, to deal with change and continue to develop. It is about how humans and nature can use shocks and disturbances like a financial crisis or climate change to spur renewal and innovative thinking. (Stockholm Resilience Centre)

Bioregional Learning Centre is developing a resilience strategy for South Devon. Our purpose as an organisation is not to offer yet another plan, instead it is to invite many stakeholders to gather and together design a strategy for collective impact.

Collective Impact is a model developed by the Stanford Centre for Social Innovation, designed to enable community-sourced solutions to large and complex issues. It draws on the principle of co-design with the users of the system, shared vision, strategy, measurement and principles. To support that, BLC has formed as a backbone organisation around which many existing organisations can align. We are focusing on relationship building and facilitation.

5 Pillars of Resilience model from The Wellbeing Project

Context

We are in a period of rapid change and growing uncertainty, facing many future challenges. Around the world, environmental issues are as pressing as economic, health and social challenges. Climate change, pollution by plastics and toxins, loss of topsoil and non-human species, limits to natural resources of all kinds, the spread of diseases, droughts, wildfires, wild-weather and floods affect us all.

These impacts will be felt both economically and ecologically. And it is going to take all of us, not just governments and experts, to come up with effective responses.

 

Our Response

To have impact, those responses need to be ‘systemic’, addressing the issues from many angles, and include widescale human-behaviour change.

While national and local governments are more focused on short-term economic growth, there is no shortage of scientific, social and economic analysis and models that give us the data and ways to action that we need in order to plan into the future for a changing world.

The Bioregional Learning Centre (BLC) has been surveying these (as well as existing local plans) and modelling what future resilience would look like in this region.

 

Resilience Strategy for South Devon

Our purpose as an organisation is not to offer yet another plan, instead it is to invite many stakeholders to gather and together design a strategy for collective impact.

Collective Impact is a model developed by the Stanford Centre for Social Innovation, designed to enable community-sourced solutions to large and complex issues. It draws on the principle of co-design with the users of the system, shared vision, strategy, measurement and principles.

To support that, BLC has formed as a backbone organisation around which many existing organisations can align. We are focusing on relationship building and facilitation.

 

Next Steps

We are working on establishing a distributed team that sits within many organisations and sectors in South Devon and holds a shared responsibility and shared goal for resilience. In the first half of 2019 there will be a meeting to launch this, from which a working group will form. It will include experts of all kinds as well as civil society.

Together with Plymouth University, BLC is mapping out an application to the United Nations University to become what is called a Regional Centre of Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development. We are establishing South Devon as a learning region.

Also in 2019, BLC is organising a ‘learning journey’ for people within South Devon and from outside to see what green shoots of resilience already exist in this region. What can be nurtured, where are the gaps, what new initiatives can come into being, what can we learn from elsewhere?

 

Our invitation to you

If you and your organisation would like to read the full report, and be involved, please reply to: Isabel.carlisle@bioregion.org.uk

We would much like to hear from you.

The reason for this focus on resilience is that we are in a period of rapid change and growing uncertainty, facing many future challenges. Around the world, environmental issues are as pressing as economic, health and social challenges. Climate change, pollution by plastics and toxins, loss of topsoil and non-human species, limits to natural resources of all kinds, the spread of diseases, droughts, wildfires, wild weather and floods affect us all. Both economically and ecologically. And it is going to take all of us, not just governments and experts, to come up with effective responses.